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Outreach in the Village of Jukwa

Today I was able to get a break from the teaching hospital environment. Early this morning, we took a bus along with some nutritionists, nurses, and a few other staff members to the village of Jukwa. It was about a 45 minute drive. During this drive, I met a public health department worker named Chandi. He was a very nice and funny guy. When we got there, I instantly took note of the village as a very small community. When we got off the bus, there was an event going on at the pavilion. The entire village was present so I was able to witness the vibe of a close knit community. After the event, the different stations were set up turning the pavilion into a mini clinic. There were many different stations including eye, dental, nutrition, health insurance, and more. I started out in the public health station where I checked blood pressure of many people. There were at least 300 people to do blood pressures for but luckily I had Chandi along with me. They also offered HIV and malaria screening tests to everyone. After a couple of hours, I headed over to the nutrition department where I was responsible for noting down the weight and height of people in order to calculate their BMI. This number would be further discussed with the nutritionist. I did get some free time as the number of people requiring medical assistance decreased in the late afternoon. During these moments, I sat down and talked with Esther. She was working in the health insurance station. We talked a lot about food and now I have some places and new things to try! It felt good to talk about something off topic after a long day. We returned to the hospital where I called a taxi in order to go home and relax. Overall, I found today to be a very great day. I am a big supporter of these outbreak events that the teaching hospital does. On average, they will do one a week. This kind of intervention provides care to those who don’t have access to health care. By doing this, we can promote health across the globe. Health equity and equality are a big topic and public health and they both differ in meaning. Health equity assured that everyone is given what they need to be successful. On the other hand, health equality occurs when everyone gets the same thing so the people who require more attention may not benefit. I think this program provides health equity whereas many health programs in the U.S. lean more towards equality. Other health systems should mirror the Ghana health system and the teaching hospital intervention to reduce the burden of disease. As discussed in yesterday’s post, rural areas are more at risk for non communicable diseases due to their lifestyle. I’m extremely tired as we got home at around 7:30 (normally I’m home at around 3:00) so I will leave it at this and see you all tomorrow! As promised, I got plenty of pictures today!

This is a picture of the village during the event that occurred in the morning. There are so many people!

This picture displays the setup of the stations where all the different tables and black tent (in the back left) resemble the different stations offered to the community.

Me doing blood pressure checks along with Chandi. We also were able to get a selfie together.

The village of Jukwa. It is definitely a lot smaller and isolated!

7/16/19

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2 Comments

  1. Good work! Nice to see you learning and gathering valuable life experiences from your trip. I enjoy reading it. Keep it up 👍

    Liked by 1 person

  2. So, you have a different experience today. Along with the medical lessons, reaching the patients you also experienced the life in rural areas. All these experiences are definitely adding to your own horizons and expanding our too. keep it up.

    Liked by 1 person

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